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Special Collections and Archives, UIC

The Special Collections blog of the University of Illinois at Chicago, discussing our three divisions (rare books, manuscripts, and university archives), as well as special collections news and events. Special Collections can be contacted via our webpage (http://library.uic.edu/special-collections). Please direct reference questions to one of the venues mentioned on our website to maintain privacy.
Jul 25 '14
ourpresidents:

Nixon and Khrushchev’s Kitchen Debates
On this day in 1959, Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev met for the opening of the American National Exhibition in Moscow. 
As Nixon led Khrushchev through the model house they began a series of impromptu debates (mainly held in the model kitchen), on capitalism and communism.  To debate such ideas both leaders used examples of household appliances to better stress their arguments.  Nixon’s performance in the “Kitchen Debate” further raised his stature back in the United States.
In this photograph we have Nixon and Khrushchev debating in front of the now famous model kitchen.  To the right of Nixon is future Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev.  7/24/59.
-from the Nixon Library 

ourpresidents:

Nixon and Khrushchev’s Kitchen Debates

On this day in 1959, Vice President Richard Nixon and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev met for the opening of the American National Exhibition in Moscow.

As Nixon led Khrushchev through the model house they began a series of impromptu debates (mainly held in the model kitchen), on capitalism and communism.  To debate such ideas both leaders used examples of household appliances to better stress their arguments.  Nixon’s performance in the “Kitchen Debate” further raised his stature back in the United States.

In this photograph we have Nixon and Khrushchev debating in front of the now famous model kitchen.  To the right of Nixon is future Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev.  7/24/59.

-from the Nixon Library 

Jul 25 '14
newberrylibrary:

Misprint in today’s @redeyechicago but the spirit of the copy still applies: we pass no judgment on how the books you buy at Book Fair spark your kinky imagination. #NLbookfair #getkinkygetbooks

While the description doesn’t really apply, the Newberry Book Fair is going on all weekend and you should totally go!

newberrylibrary:

Misprint in today’s @redeyechicago but the spirit of the copy still applies: we pass no judgment on how the books you buy at Book Fair spark your kinky imagination. #NLbookfair #getkinkygetbooks

While the description doesn’t really apply, the Newberry Book Fair is going on all weekend and you should totally go!

Jul 25 '14

usnatarchives:

Happy National Hot Dog Day! Summer is the perfect time for a hot dog, whether it comes at a baseball game, during lunch, or from a barbecue grill. 

In 1939, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth dined with President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt in their Hyde Park home. It may have been a special occasion, but FDR still served his guests hot dogs and beer. 

The two featured images are of the menu for the picnic and a picture from the picnic showing King George VI, Sara D. Roosevelt, New York State Governor Herbert Lehman, and Elinor Morgenthau. Photo Courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. To find out more about the British Royal Visit in 1939 visit:http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/aboutfdr/royalvisit.html

It’s comforting to know that you too can dine like the president when he entertains royalty.

Jul 25 '14

muspeccoll:

Beef: It’s What’s for Dinner! Here’s Mrs. Beeton’s recipe for baked beef, from the 1899 edition of her Book of Household Management:

Ingredients.—About 2 lbs. of cold roast beef, 2 small onions, 1 large carrot or two small ones, 1 turnip, a small bunch of savoury herbs, salt and pepper to taste, 4 tablespoonfuls of gravy, 3 tablespoonfuls of ale, crust or mashed potatoes.
Mode.— Cut the beef in slices, allowing a small amount of fat to each slice; place a layer of this in the bottom of a pie-dish, with a portion of the onions, carrots, and turnips, which must be sliced; mince the herbs, strew them over the meat, and season with pepper and salt. Then put another layer of meat, vegetables, and seasoning; and proceed in this manner until all the ingredients are used. Pour in the gravy and ale (water may be substituted for the former, but it is not so nice), cover with a crust or mashed potatoes, and bake for ½ hour, or rather longer.
Time.—Rather more than ½ hour.
Average cost, exclusive of the meat, 6d.
Sufficient for 5 or 6 persons.
Seasonable at any time.
Note.—It is as well to parboil the carrots and turnips before adding them to the meat, and to use some of the liquor in which they were boiled as a substitute for gravy ; that is to say, when there is no gravy at hand. Be particular to cut the onions in very thin slices.

(via Friday Food: Isabella Beeton’s Recipe for Baked Beef, 1861 | Scripta manent.)

Jul 24 '14
calumet412:

A youth’s guide to the Columbian Exposition, featuring the Administration Building, 1893, Chicago.

Take a look at the whole thing!

calumet412:

A youth’s guide to the Columbian Exposition, featuring the Administration Building, 1893, Chicago.

Take a look at the whole thing!

Jul 24 '14
houghtonlib:

Guillemeau, Jacque, approximately 1530-1613. Tables anatomiques, avec les pourtraicts et declaration d’iceulx, 1586.
Typ 515.86.440
Houghton Library, Harvard University

houghtonlib:

Guillemeau, Jacque, approximately 1530-1613. Tables anatomiques, avec les pourtraicts et declaration d’iceulx, 1586.

Typ 515.86.440

Houghton Library, Harvard University

Jul 23 '14

iowawomensarchives:

Sept. 17, 1918 - Tonight the big hospital train came in and every one was on duty until late bathing and dressing the poor boys. Such horrible wounds. How can any one of us complain after seeing the brave acceptance which the boys display…

Here’s a sneak preview from our upcoming World War I digital collection and transcription project, featuing the photo album and journal of Louise Liers, a Clayton, Iowa, native and Army nurse who spent 16 months in France treating wounded soldiers. Check back for links to the full items soon!

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Louise Liers papers, 1911-1983

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

If you’re in Chicago (or just interested in nursing history), check out the Midwest Nursing History Research Center on UIC’s medical campus!

Jul 23 '14
Jul 20 '14
conservethis:

ruudbaan:

Gil by Ruud Baan, Isis Vaandrager

ಠ_ಠ
This is pretty much exactly the wrong way to pull a book off the shelf. 
I bet that guy’s library is just full of books with torn headcaps.
The RIGHT way is to push the surrounding books back, then grasp the book you want by the MIDDLE OF THE SPINE. Then you can pull it off the shelf. 
Like so (image from University of Delaware libraries): 


*~the more you know~*

conservethis:

ruudbaan:

Gil by Ruud Baan, Isis Vaandrager

ಠ_ಠ

This is pretty much exactly the wrong way to pull a book off the shelf. 

I bet that guy’s library is just full of books with torn headcaps.

The RIGHT way is to push the surrounding books back, then grasp the book you want by the MIDDLE OF THE SPINE. Then you can pull it off the shelf. 

Like so (image from University of Delaware libraries): 

*~the more you know~*

Jul 19 '14
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The 1st Black Woman to Win Gold at the Olympics
Alice Coachman stood alone atop the podium at the 1948 London Olympics. The 24-year-old form Albany, Georgia had won the women’s high jump, clearing 5’ 6 1/8” (1.68 m) on the bar, a new Olympic record. This made her the only woman on the U.S. track and field team to medal, and more importantly, the first black woman to win gold in Olympic history.
Ms. Coachman* was the greatest high jumper of her time but 1948 was her only Olympic appearance because of the cancellation of the previous two games due to World War II. Ms. Coachman won ten straight AAU high jump titles (1939-1948) - the first when she was only 15. She also won five straight AAU 50 meter outdoor sprints from 1943 to 1947 and was a national champion in the 100 meter sprint and 4 x 100m relay.
Growing up in rural Georgia, Ms. Coachman was always attracted to athletic pursuits, something her father disliked intensely. She told of receiving beatings when he caught her running and jumping like a boy around town. But she continued to train and found support from her fifth grade teacher, Cora Bailey and her aunt, Carrie Spry. She eventually enrolled at Tuskegee University where she became a national track and field star.
Following the Olympics, Ms. Coachman was appropriately lauded as a champion. She joined other Olympians meeting President Truman at the White House, and legendary musician Count Basie threw her a party. Her hometown of Albany held a ceremony and parade for her. But as a black woman in the South she couldn’t escape the segregation that permeated the culture: the mayor of Albany would not shake her hand and she was not allowed to enter or exit through the front door of the auditorium.
She earned a teaching degree from Albany State College, where she transferred after the Olympic games. Ms. Coachman taught elementary and high school students while continuing to encourage young men and women to pursue athletics. She founded the Alice Coachman Track and Field Foundation which provides financial assistance to young Olympic hopefuls as well as Olympic veterans. 
In 1952, Ms. Coachman was offered an endorsement deal from Coca-Cola. When she accepted she became the first black woman paid to advertise a national product.
Ms. Coachman is still honored annually with the Alice Coachman Track Invitational held at Albany State, established in 1992. She is a member of nine halls of fame including the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame (1975) and the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame (2004). Her hometown also named an elementary school in her honor.
Alice Coachman, who was the subject of a 2012 children’s book titled Touch the Sky, died on July 14, 2014 at the age of 90.
* Ms. Coachman married twice, both times to men with the surname Daivs, but in all articles she was referred to by her maiden name, so I have chosen to do the same.
Sources: NY Times, Albany (GA) Herald, WALB-TV, National Women’s History Month
(Image of the 1948 Olympics high jump medal ceremony with Alice Coachman winning gold, Dorothy Tyler of Great Britain taking silver, and Micheline Ostermeyer earning bronze. It is courtesy of www.filmsnotdead.com)’
Other 1948 Olympians featured on Obit of the Day:
Ann Curtis - U.S. swimmer who won two gold medals at the games
Moose Thompson - Gold medal-winning shot putter
Walter Walsh - Member of the U.S. pistol team, also the oldest living Marine and FBI agent
and one pioneer…
Halet Cambel - The 1st Muslim woman to compete at the Olympics (1936)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: The 1st Black Woman to Win Gold at the Olympics

Alice Coachman stood alone atop the podium at the 1948 London Olympics. The 24-year-old form Albany, Georgia had won the women’s high jump, clearing 5’ 6 1/8” (1.68 m) on the bar, a new Olympic record. This made her the only woman on the U.S. track and field team to medal, and more importantly, the first black woman to win gold in Olympic history.

Ms. Coachman* was the greatest high jumper of her time but 1948 was her only Olympic appearance because of the cancellation of the previous two games due to World War II. Ms. Coachman won ten straight AAU high jump titles (1939-1948) - the first when she was only 15. She also won five straight AAU 50 meter outdoor sprints from 1943 to 1947 and was a national champion in the 100 meter sprint and 4 x 100m relay.

Growing up in rural Georgia, Ms. Coachman was always attracted to athletic pursuits, something her father disliked intensely. She told of receiving beatings when he caught her running and jumping like a boy around town. But she continued to train and found support from her fifth grade teacher, Cora Bailey and her aunt, Carrie Spry. She eventually enrolled at Tuskegee University where she became a national track and field star.

Following the Olympics, Ms. Coachman was appropriately lauded as a champion. She joined other Olympians meeting President Truman at the White House, and legendary musician Count Basie threw her a party. Her hometown of Albany held a ceremony and parade for her. But as a black woman in the South she couldn’t escape the segregation that permeated the culture: the mayor of Albany would not shake her hand and she was not allowed to enter or exit through the front door of the auditorium.

She earned a teaching degree from Albany State College, where she transferred after the Olympic games. Ms. Coachman taught elementary and high school students while continuing to encourage young men and women to pursue athletics. She founded the Alice Coachman Track and Field Foundation which provides financial assistance to young Olympic hopefuls as well as Olympic veterans. 

In 1952, Ms. Coachman was offered an endorsement deal from Coca-Cola. When she accepted she became the first black woman paid to advertise a national product.

Ms. Coachman is still honored annually with the Alice Coachman Track Invitational held at Albany State, established in 1992. She is a member of nine halls of fame including the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame (1975) and the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame (2004). Her hometown also named an elementary school in her honor.

Alice Coachman, who was the subject of a 2012 children’s book titled Touch the Sky, died on July 14, 2014 at the age of 90.

* Ms. Coachman married twice, both times to men with the surname Daivs, but in all articles she was referred to by her maiden name, so I have chosen to do the same.

Sources: NY Times, Albany (GA) Herald, WALB-TV, National Women’s History Month

(Image of the 1948 Olympics high jump medal ceremony with Alice Coachman winning gold, Dorothy Tyler of Great Britain taking silver, and Micheline Ostermeyer earning bronze. It is courtesy of www.filmsnotdead.com)’

Other 1948 Olympians featured on Obit of the Day:

Ann Curtis - U.S. swimmer who won two gold medals at the games

Moose Thompson - Gold medal-winning shot putter

Walter Walsh - Member of the U.S. pistol team, also the oldest living Marine and FBI agent

and one pioneer…

Halet Cambel - The 1st Muslim woman to compete at the Olympics (1936)