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Special Collections and Archives, UIC

The Special Collections blog of the University of Illinois at Chicago, discussing our three divisions (rare books, manuscripts, and university archives), as well as special collections news and events. Special Collections can be contacted via our webpage (http://library.uic.edu/special-collections). Please direct reference questions to one of the venues mentioned on our website to maintain privacy.
Sep 30 '14
Degrees of Freedom: Higher Education in America [rebroadcast]

backstoryradio:

Fall has arrived - and so, like millions of college students across the country, BackStory is headed back to campus. We’re tackling the history of higher education on our latest episode. Take a listen.

Sep 29 '14
calumet412:

Co-eds at the entrance to the UIC Navy Pier Campus, 1954, Chicago.

It’s us! See tons more pictures from the Navy Pier Campus on our website!

calumet412:

Co-eds at the entrance to the UIC Navy Pier Campus, 1954, Chicago.

It’s us! See tons more pictures from the Navy Pier Campus on our website!

Sep 29 '14

newberryprinting:

Beautiful engravings from the volume of plates accompanying Réflexions et observations anatomico-chirurgicales sur l’anévrisme (1809-1813) by Scarpa. The engravings were done by Adam based on the original etchings by Anderloni.

Newberry call number: Wing oversize ZP 839 .C85153

Sep 28 '14
calumet412:

Union Park, 1921, Chicago

Looks like an excellent place for a music festival!

calumet412:

Union Park, 1921, Chicago

Looks like an excellent place for a music festival!

Sep 28 '14

via starry-eyed-wolfchild:

A town known as the “town of books”, Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the United Kingdom and is a bibliophile’s sanctuary.

Vacation?

(Source: whenonearth.net)

Sep 27 '14
Sep 26 '14
Sep 26 '14

uispeccoll:

Robert May (1588?-1664) was one of very few cooks in England who received extensive training in English and French training (and even some Spanish and Italian). May was the son of Edward May the cook for the Dormers of Ascott Park, a wealthy Catholic family.  “W.W.,” May’s biographer, believed that it was the Dormers’ and his father’s influence that led to May studying cookery in France for five years. After his training, May worked with his father and cooked for the Dormers. He was chef to a numer of other Catholic families within the Dormers’ social circle as well.

May’s biography prefaces his book, The accomplisht cook, or, The art & mystery of cookery. May included incredibly detailed descriptions on how to prepare flesh, fowl, fish, or any other manner of à-la-mode curiosities.  The book includes small woodcuts throughout, but the most exciting features are the fold out diagrams for making all manner of pies.  Two whole chapters are dedicated to the many ways to make pies! If you are making a fish pie the crust better show the shape of the fish you are preparing!

-Jillian (who now wishes she had found this book before making her first pie last weekend)

TX705 .M46 1685

Sep 26 '14

The Story of School Lunch: Experimentation in the Progressive Era

congresscenters:

image

Front cover, USDA Farmer’s Bulletin No. 712 published in March 1916

The Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies will be opening a new exhibit which will explore the history of the National School Lunch Program.

Food, Power, and Politics: The Story of School Lunch will be on display in the Harrison Feature Gallery inside the Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries from September 26, 2014 through May 15, 2015.

What a neat-sounding exhibit!

Sep 26 '14
mapsontheweb:

Map of each U.S. States Favorite Foods

mapsontheweb:

Map of each U.S. States Favorite Foods