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Special Collections and Archives, UIC

The Special Collections blog of the University of Illinois at Chicago, discussing our three divisions (rare books, manuscripts, and university archives), as well as special collections news and events. Special Collections can be contacted via our webpage (http://library.uic.edu/special-collections). Please direct reference questions to one of the venues mentioned on our website to maintain privacy.
Sep 11 '14
Sep 11 '14
Sep 10 '14

chicagotribune:

There began a hyped interest in the cowboy-cowgirl culture of rodeo in Chicago in the 1920s. The highly-lucrative sport earned competitors thousands of dollars and the events sometimes drew more than 350,000 spectators. By the 1940s, Rodeo culture bloomed into all-around circus-like entertainment that included acts such as Hollywood daredevils and steeplechase jumping horses. Here are great scenes from the long-established sport and recreation.

We’ve got a whole bunch more Chicago Tribune historical photos I reckon y’all are gonna love. (Editor’s note: Rodeo talk is a one-time only benefit of following our Tumblr)

We wouldn’t say no to a comeback…

Sep 10 '14
themanonfive:

Mies van der Rohe in front of 860-880 N. Lake Shore Drive. Year unknown. 

themanonfive:

Mies van der Rohe in front of 860-880 N. Lake Shore Drive. Year unknown. 

Sep 10 '14
Sep 10 '14
Sep 10 '14
broadcastarchive-umd:

ABOVE: Two sixteen-inch transcription discs from among the thousands in our collection:
Before about 1950, when radio networks and local stations wanted to preserve a live broadcast, they did so by means of special phonograph records known as “electrical transcriptions" (ETs), made by cutting a sound-modulated groove into a blank disc.
At first, in the early 1930s, the blanks varied in both size and composition, but most often they were simply bare aluminum and the groove was indented rather than cut. Typically, these very early recordings were not made by the network or radio station, but by a private recording service contracted by the broadcast sponsor or one of the performers. The bare aluminum discs were typically 10 or 12 inches in diameter and recorded at the then-standard speed of 78 RPM, which meant that several disc sides were required to accommodate even a 15-minute program.
By about 1936, 16-inch aluminum-based discs coated with cellulose nitrate lacquer, commonly known as acetates and recorded at a speed of 331⁄3 RPM, had been adopted by the networks and individual radio stations as the standard medium for recording broadcasts. The making of such recordings, at least for some purposes, then became routine.
Some discs were recorded using a “hill and dale” vertically modulated groove, rather than the “lateral” side-to-side modulation found on the records being made for home use at that time. The large slow-speed discs could easily contain fifteen minutes on each side, allowing an hour-long program to be recorded on only two discs. The lacquer was softer than shellac or vinyl and wore more rapidly, allowing only a few playbacks with the heavy pickups and steel needles then in use before deterioration became audible.
During World War II, aluminum became a necessary material for the war effort and was in short supply. This caused an alternative to be sought for the base on which to coat the lacquer. Glass, despite its obvious disadvantage of fragility, had occasionally been used in earlier years because it could provide a perfectly smooth and even supporting surface for mastering and other critical applications. Glass base recording blanks came into general use for the duration of the war. (Wikipedia)
Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture
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broadcastarchive-umd:

ABOVE: Two sixteen-inch transcription discs from among the thousands in our collection:

Before about 1950, when radio networks and local stations wanted to preserve a live broadcast, they did so by means of special phonograph records known as “electrical transcriptions" (ETs), made by cutting a sound-modulated groove into a blank disc.

At first, in the early 1930s, the blanks varied in both size and composition, but most often they were simply bare aluminum and the groove was indented rather than cut. Typically, these very early recordings were not made by the network or radio station, but by a private recording service contracted by the broadcast sponsor or one of the performers. The bare aluminum discs were typically 10 or 12 inches in diameter and recorded at the then-standard speed of 78 RPM, which meant that several disc sides were required to accommodate even a 15-minute program.

By about 1936, 16-inch aluminum-based discs coated with cellulose nitrate lacquer, commonly known as acetates and recorded at a speed of 3313 RPM, had been adopted by the networks and individual radio stations as the standard medium for recording broadcasts. The making of such recordings, at least for some purposes, then became routine.

Some discs were recorded using a “hill and dale” vertically modulated groove, rather than the “lateral” side-to-side modulation found on the records being made for home use at that time. The large slow-speed discs could easily contain fifteen minutes on each side, allowing an hour-long program to be recorded on only two discs. The lacquer was softer than shellac or vinyl and wore more rapidly, allowing only a few playbacks with the heavy pickups and steel needles then in use before deterioration became audible.

During World War II, aluminum became a necessary material for the war effort and was in short supply. This caused an alternative to be sought for the base on which to coat the lacquer. Glass, despite its obvious disadvantage of fragility, had occasionally been used in earlier years because it could provide a perfectly smooth and even supporting surface for mastering and other critical applications. Glass base recording blanks came into general use for the duration of the war. (Wikipedia)

Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture

Tumblr Archive  |  Ask A Question

Sep 9 '14
my-ear-trumpet:


— John Overholt (@john_overholt)
March 22, 2014

my-ear-trumpet:

Sep 9 '14
archivesofamericanart:

Fancy making your own writing ink? Just grab eight ounces of goose grease and some other witches’ brew items. Dazzle your friends and Pinterest followers with this recipe from the Harriet Endicott Waite research material on Currier and Ives, a 19th century printmaking firm. 

In case you were wondering what Gum Mastic is!

archivesofamericanart:

Fancy making your own writing ink? Just grab eight ounces of goose grease and some other witches’ brew items. Dazzle your friends and Pinterest followers with this recipe from the Harriet Endicott Waite research material on Currier and Ives, a 19th century printmaking firm. 

In case you were wondering what Gum Mastic is!

Sep 6 '14

Shelf-Reading: Images of America: Chicago Heights

readwritelibrary:

image

“Shelf-Reading” is an ongoing series where we feature various items in the Read/Write Library’s collection of location-specific, independent, and small press media.

In 1833, the same year two hundred settlers organized the town of Chicago, another nucleus of settlers began gathering about thirty miles south. Their community grew into a miniature, parallel version of its northern neighbor: a Rust Belt boomtown with its own Louis Sullivan architecture and the nickname “Crossroads of America.”

Images of America: Chicago Heights tells this story in photographs. Originally it was a farming village in southeastern Cook County called Thorn Grove, and then Bloom. The town took its third and final name in 1892 at the behest of some local real estate magnates, who called themselves the Chicago Heights Land Association. (Trivia: the association president was Chicago businessman Charles Wacker, who lent his surname to the Loop’s Wacker Drive.) 

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